The Research about Purchasing Portable Dental Unit

The dental units generally need connecting to electrical, as well as drainage and plumbing systems.Transportation to the dental office is cited by many of the elderly as a barrier to dental treatment. Mobile (bus dental unite) or portable services eliminate the transportation barrier by bringing the service to the client. The portable dental chair will provide greater assistance to disabled clients living in those out of reach places. They make it possible for the elderly to receive the care they deserve. The mobile and portable dental services will also enable care for the elderly in their homes or care facilities. The demand for dental care will continue to increase.

The elderly population is rapidly growing in the world. It is estimated that 3.5 million US elderly people will be living in long-term care facilities by year 2030. In some situations, transport infrastructure may also restrict access to care. There are some areas in Iran that are inaccessible when roads are not passable, such as the mountainous villages in and around Fereydoon-shahr.

More complex portable units include a vacuum canister, dentist ultrasonic scaler, radiographic equipment along with compressors for air-water syringes and high- and low-speed handpieces. This equipment is stored and transported in durable boxes and cases.

The rationale for these chairs is to allow provision of simple filling and basic preventative treatments such as fluoride therapy and fissure sealants, but they remain largely unevaluated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore dentists’ perceptions of the use of portable dental units in community outreach programs.

Starting your own dental practice is no easy task. Purchasing portable dental unit for your practice can also be difficult. On average, a new dental practice will spend around $500,000 on structural upfit, equipment and supplies for their business. To make sure you are getting the most for your money, consider the following tips before diving into the world of dental equipment sales.

Before making any final decisions and purchasing dental equipment for sale, do as much research as possible on your own first. Doing so will help you understand all that the market has to offer and what your options are.

It is never a good rule of thumb to buy something simply because it is available or because it is affordable for you. Find out exactly what your practice needs and then begin your research on the quality products to invest in. This is because buying portable dental equipment is just that, an investment. Check the product’s features and confirm how it will make your practice more effective.

What’s the Diagnosis of Endodontics Depends On

November 4, 2016 (Newswire) –Diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical outcome assessment in endodontics depend to a large extent on radiographic examinations. Conventional periapical radiographs, either captured on conventional x-ray film( dental x ray machine portable ) or digital are used for the management of endodontic problems provide limited information because of the combination of their two dimensional nature, geometric distortion, anatomical noise, and temporal perspective.

Useful information such as the presence, location and extent of periradicular lesions, the anatomy of root-canals( root canal treatment equipment ) and the proximity of adjacent anatomical structures provided by periapical radiographs are exposed during endodontic treatment procedures . Inspite of widespread use periapical images, either captured on x-ray film or digital sensors, provide limited information .

The most important limitation of periapical radiographs is that they do not always accurately reflect the anatomy being assessed because of the complexity of the maxillofacial skeleton . In endodontic practice, radiographs are recorded using the paralleling technique / long-cone or right-angle technique, instead of the bisecting angle technique, as it produces more geometrically accurate images.

For accurate reproduction of anatomy in the paralleling technique, the radiographic film or RVG sensor should be placed parallel to the long axis of the tooth, and the x-ray beam should be directed perpendicular both to the image receptor and the tooth being assessed. The lack of long-axis orientation results in geometric distortion of the radiographic image.

Another important principle in endodontic radiology is to display the structures of diagnostic interest onto a background as homogeneous as possible . However, the anatomical structures surrounding the tooth may superimpose and cause difficulty in interpreting periapical radiographs.Various studies have demonstrated the difficulty of radiographically visualizing the periapical lesions confined to the cancellous bone, as the denser overlying cortical plate masks the area of interest.

Anatomical noise also accounts for some underestimation of the size of periapical lesion on radiographic images .Anatomical noise is dependent on several factors such as non-optimal irradiation geometry, overlying anatomy,the thickness of the cancellous bone and cortical plate, and the relationship of the root apices to the cortical plate.

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A Brief Introduction of the Generation of Dental Apex Locator

The development of the electronic apex locator (EAL) has helped make the assessment of

working length more accurate and predictable, particularly useful when the apical portion of

the canal system is obscured by certain anatomic structures:Impacted teeth, tori ,zygomatic

arch, excessive bone density, overlapping roots and shallow palatal vault.
The objective of working length determination is to establish the length (distance from the

apex) at which canal preparation and subsequent obturation are to be terminated. Methods

for determining working length are radiographs , electronic apex locators, tactile sense,

mathematics method, apical periodontal sensitivity, paper points, microscopic magnification

and average tooth length.


Root canals are surrounded by dentine and cementum that are insulators to electric current.

At the apical foramen there is a small hole in which conductive materials within the canal are

electrically connected to the periodontal ligament that is a conductor of electric current. The

resistive material of the canal (dentine, tissue, fluid) with a particular resistivity forms a

resistor, the value of which depends on the length, cross-sectional area and the resistivity of

the materials .


The first generation: Resistance between the periodontium and the oral mucous membrane in humans was

constant at 6.5 K Ohm, regardless of the age of the patients or the shape and type of teeth.

Contents of the canal (vital pulp tester vs. necrotic pulp) also had no effect upon the resistance.

First-generation apex location devices measure the opposition to the flow of direct current

or resistance. The resistance was measured between the two electrodes to determine

location within a canal. Pain was often felt with this type of apex locator.
Second-generation apex locatorsmeasure the opposition to the flow of alternating current or

impedance.This generation contains 2 types of apex locator: low frequency and high

frequency apex locator. Low frequency AL is based on the assumption that the impedance

between the oral mucous membrane and the depth of the gingival sulcus closely resembles

the impedance between the canal terminus and the oral mucous membrane.


The 3rd generation apex locator has been called “frequency dependent” apex locators. This

type was supplied by 2 frequencies to measure the impedance in the canal. There are 2

types of the 3rd generation ALs: impedance difference type and impedance ratio type.

Impedance difference AL measures the impedance value at two different frequencies and

calculates the difference between the two values (Yamashita, 1990) while impedance ratio

type measured the position of the file from the ratio between these two impedances.


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The Benefits of Piezo-electric Scaler

The piezo-electric scaler is a staple in our hygiene rooms. Hygienists in our office rave about our new piezo-electric scalers and, more importantly, patients are very complimentary about how their mouths feel after their maintenance visits. If you have the desire to move into the world of electric scalers, or are ready to upgrade, give considerable thought to the purchase of a piezo-electric scaler. This technology will stand the test of time. It is the ultimate in dental ultrasonic scalers.

Piezo-electric scalers in particular have some distinct advantages over many other conventional ultrasonic units. In addition to the previously mentioned benefits of ultrasonics in general, piezo-electric technology offers the following:

(1) versatile ultrasonic units have numerous clinical applications due to a comprehensive range of accessories; in addition to inserts for use in scaling and debridement, many other inserts are available for procedures such as periodontics, apical surgery, and prosthodontics; dozens of various inserts are offered that all fit on the same handpiece.

(2) less water is necessary during the procedure, adding to patient comfort and operator convenience; less need for management of excessive water accumulation; less water is required because the unit’s efficiency is greater than 90%—there is no delivered energy or mechanical friction, hence, little secondary temperature rise; since there is very little temperature rise, the handpiece can be used without water.

(3) LED curing light is available with some units—much more convenient to assemble and operate than conventional curing lights, saving time, money, and space; the light simply attaches to the unit in place of the piezo-electric handpiece; perfect for sealant curing in the hygiene room as well as for restorative materials.

(4) easy, convenient barrier protection—intraoral camera sheaths intimately fit many piezo-electric handpieces; barrier protection for the unit itself is provided by simply placing a sheet of plastic wrap loosely over the entire unit; with this in place, the operator can adjust the water and power setting and place the dental handpiece in its holder without contaminating the unit, which minimizes the use of surface disinfectant, which would add time following the procedure and risk damaging the unit.

(5) the use of state-of-the-art technology helps to strengthen patient relations; communicating with patients and educating them about the advantages of the piezo-electric scaler is a practice builder; patients feel more comfortable throughout the procedure and confident that they are receiving the best possible care.

Brief Historical Background of Controlled Memory Technology

Optimal cleaning and shaping of root canal systems requires, among many things, the coincident integration and tangible application of numerous anatomical, clinical, and technique driven considerations. For example, the case must be diagnosed correctly; the clinical risk assessed; the technique, clinical supplies, and instruments selected; and all of the above used correctly and simultaneously to achieve the treatment objectives.

The first generation of Ni-Ti was ground from Ni-Ti file blanks and not heat-treated. Such first-generation instruments are superelastic. Superelasticity denotes the ability of the file to deform (strain) from its original shape under a physical load (stress). Clinically, this is manifest as a Ni-Ti file rotating in a curved canal and returning to its original shape upon removal from the root canal treatment equipment.

In essence, the Ni-Ti undergoes a transformation (the instrument is “strained”) from its harder austenite crystalline phase configuration to its softer martensitic crystalline phase configuration while under such “stress.” When the stress is relieved, it returns to its original shape (austenite). Such behavior is termed “shape memory.” First-generation (nonheat-treated) Ni-Ti instruments can generally accommodate approximately an 8% strain before fracture. In contrast, CM instruments do not possess superelasticity and do not undergo the aforementioned transformation.

The second generation of Ni-Ti files is heat-treated, either in the bulk raw material stage before grinding or, alternatively, after grinding. CM instruments are a subset of this second generation of heat-treated instruments. CM technology was introduced in 2010. Heat treatment processes are proprietary.

Interestingly, there is a new file that is heat-treated only in the apical 10 mm of its cutting flutes, providing flexibility at its working end. To the author’s knowledge, for all other current systems, heat treatment encompasses the entire instrument.

CM files are unique among the commercial products available at this time. While made of heat-treated Ni-Ti, they remain curved as they rotate around a curved canal. CM files do not regain their original shape after use. Hence, they have “controlled memory.” The literature suggests this CM feature reduces transportation and conserves tooth structure. The literature also states that CM files are 300% to 900% more resistant to cyclic fatigue and have a statistically significant greater flexibility than their first generation superelastic counterparts. Aside from flexibility, CM files have essentially equivalent torsional strength to nonheat-treated files.

In the existing scientific literature published to date, there are no unfavorable reported findings on CM attributes. The current literature file on CM technology is available by email from the author on request.

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