The Ways about How to Use Storage to Control Compressed Air Costs

There are many ways to use storage in a compressed air system to improve the performance and repeatability of production equipment. No one method is a total solution. Some industry professionals will tell you that storage is not required for certain types of compressors.

The system, however, can not afford the impact on either performance or operating costs. The alternative to applying storage is to operate at higher pressures with more power all of the time in order to support critical applications and the peak air demand experienced in the system.

There are six basic areas where storage should be properly engineered and applied in the system. These are:

Dedicated storage to improve the speed, thrust, or torque of an application.
Dedicated storage to protect a critical application from pressure fluctuations.
Dedicated storage to meter a high rate of flow application into the system.
General or overhead storage to support applications during the transmission time to the supply side and to create transparency between applications.
Control storage to support events in the system within an allowable pressure drop.
Off line, higher pressure air stored to support large system events and reduce peak electrical demand.

There are a few fundamental principles which must be discussed to understand when and how to apply storage in the system:

First, the article pressure in a system is the terminating pressure at the actual inlet connection to the device. It is not at the regulator or the header, so when someone says they have to have 90 psig for a particular device, it is very important to know where they are monitoring that pressure. This appears to be a small distinction but it makes a huge difference in what is required to support the article.
Second, the purpose of the system is to deliver the required mass of air to the article within the required time. Compressed air travels at a limited velocity inside the system determined by the pressure differential that exists. At 1 psid, this velocity is approximately 250 feet/second which means if the dental air compressors are more than 250 feet away, they won’t see an event which is less than 1 second duration until after it is complete. If you forget to consider time, the value of these storage concepts will be very difficult to grasp.
Third, the primary formula for applying useful storage or capacitance is the capacity to store times the allowable pressure drop. For example, if I have a 660-gallon tank and I can afford to allow the pressure to drop 10 psi then the useful storage is calculated as: (660 gallons / 7.48 gallons/cubic foot) / 14.5 psia = 6.07sscf / psi x 10 psi = 60.7 scf of usable stored air.


The Information about Dental Air Cleaning

The air in dental surgeries has a variety of microbiological particulates and aerosols generated from ultrasonic scaler and high-speed drills. They vary in size from 0.5 to 5 microns in diameter and can remain airborne for many hours.

Dentists and their staff can easily inhale the viruses and bacteria contained within the aerosols, with facemasks offering no protection against this fine particulate pollution. Capturing these microorganisms reduces the risk of cross-infection – for the patient, the dentist and the team.

Dental Surgeries use chemical disinfectants to decontaminate hands, surfaces and instruments. While eliminating viruses, germs and fungal spores, disinfectants often contain toxic agents such as aldehydes (formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde) or phenol. Continuous low-level exposure to aldehydes can have negative health effects, such as breathing difficulties, memory impairment, eye and skin irritation and irregular heartbeat. Toxic compounds such as isopropanol, ethanol and n-propanol can also cause irritation of the respiratory tract and the mucous membranes.

Mercury Vapours

Recent research studies have found that both dentists and their staff have a higher than average level of mercury in their body. Mercury is used in the amalgam for routine dental fillings. Mercury transforms from a solid to a gas at room temperature. The gas (which is the most easily absorbed type of mercury) can be inhaled when amalgam is placed in the mouth or removed. Mercury is highly toxic and humans should not be exposed to it.

With this news and patients becoming more health conscious, requests for amalgam removals by dental amalgamator are rising steadily. It is therefore now more important than ever, for dentists to protect themselves and their team from this harmful substance.

Dental Air Conditioning

It is now commonplace for dentists to have air-conditioning systems installed. These installation systems are, however, often a source of contamination themselves, either because they are equipped with less then adequate filtration or because they are drawing in polluted air from outside without filtering it sufficiently. Indoor air contamination can be many times greater than external conditions, and dental air cleaning is required.

Prompted by an ever growing number of dentist offices as customers, Commercial Air Filtration specifies the IQAir Dental Series which has been developed to provide a flexible, cost effective, silent and low maintenance air cleaning solution for dental practices.

What Features does a Dental Compressor Need to Have

Nowadays, the dental air compressor is most likely not your main concern when going to the dentist for your yearly check. But studies have shown that the air that your dentist uses to blow dry your teeth isn’t always very healthy for you.  A whole range of oil-free compressors is available on the market. Oil-free compressors have the big advantage that they are 100% oil-free, so there is zero chance of oil in the compressed air system. Why first contaminate the air, to clean it up again later with filters, when you can create clean compressed air with an oil-free compressor?

The oil in oil-lubricated compressors will create a protective film of oil inside the air receiver and air piping. But still, an oil-free compressor would be highly favorable over an oil-lubricated one. There are galvanized or stainless steel air receivers available nowadays, as well as plastic compressed air piping, which will eliminate the problem of corrosion.

Water in the compressed air is a common problem in compressed air system, and it is especially a big concern for dental air systems. For this reason, a dental compressor should be equipped with an compressed air dryer. There are different types of air dryers available, mainly refrigerated and desiccant. But I would recommend the adsorption air dryer .

Desiccant compressed air dryers will create a much lower pressure dewpoint, as low as minus 40 degrees or more. This means that the relative humidity in the compressed air system, and the absolute amount of water in the air (grams/m3) is also very low.

Besides producing clean air (no oil, no water), a dental compressor has some other features that are a must-have for many dentists.

As they are installed in a clean clinic, in a office-like environment (as opposed to an industrial environment), the compressor needs to be quiet, small and work on a standard 220 / 100 volt power outlet.

As the dentist will be busy with its everyday job of fixing peoples teeth, he won’t be very concerned with compressor maintenance. So a maintenance free compressor would be ideal.

When buying a compressor, also make sure that the output (the amount of air it can produce per minute or hour) is right for you. A too-small compressor will give you problem for the obvious reason that the pressure will drop when too many people use air at once.

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