Some Information about Dental Implant Surface

Dental root form implants are manufactured from a highgrade titanium alloy, the surface of which consists of a micro layer of titanium oxide. The implant surface can also be treated by plasma spraying, acid etching, sandblasting or coated with HA. The removal of plaque and calculus deposits from these implant surfaces with Dental Instruments designed originally for cleaning natural tooth surfaces can result in major alterations to the delicate titanium oxide layer. Altering the surface topography by roughening the surface may enhance calculus and bacterial plaque accumulation.

Resulting scratches, cuts or gouges may also reduce the corrosion resistancy of titanium, and corrosion and mechanical debris can accumulate in the surrounding tissue. The aim of procedures for debriding dental implants should be to remove microbial and other soft deposits, without altering the implant surface, and thereby adversely affect biocompatibility. Increased surface roughness can lead to an increase in bacterial accumulation and resultant soft tissue inflammation. Because of the critical nature of the implant/soft tissue relationship, metal ultrasonic scaler tips, hand scalers or curettes should not be used as they have been shown to significantly alter the titanium surface.

Current methods for professional cleaning of implant or titanium transmucosal elements include the set of plastic ultrasonic tips( ultrasonic scaler ) or hand instruments followed by the prophy cup polishing method or various types of floss and buffing strips. The design of the permanently cemented super structure often does not allow adequate access for the prophy cup, especially in interproximal areas, and plastic instruments are not very efficient for the removal of plaque or mineralized deposits. In addition, the prophy cup and paste method may leave residual paste at the implant/soft tissue interface area.

Airpolishing consists of directing, water, air and sodium bicarbonate towards the tooth or implant surface, resulting in efficient removal of bacterial plaque and soft mineralized deposits. The residual powder is biocompatible and being soluble is not retained at the implant/soft tissue interface( dental implant machine ).

Two airpolishing systems are currently available. One system, typically available on the Dentsply Prophyjet? and Cavijet,? the EMS Airflow, and the Satelec units, delivers the air and powder, typically at 60-80 psi pressure through one nozzel and the water through a separate concentric nozzel. Some mixing of the streams takes place at the interface of the streams, but the centre of the stream consists essentially of dry powder. This “Biphasic” stream is directed at the tooth or implant surface. Several studies have investigated this system, and its effects on implant surfaces, and conclude that this system can result in significant changes to the implant surface.

The Information about Dental Air Cleaning

The air in dental surgeries has a variety of microbiological particulates and aerosols generated from ultrasonic scaler and high-speed drills. They vary in size from 0.5 to 5 microns in diameter and can remain airborne for many hours.

Dentists and their staff can easily inhale the viruses and bacteria contained within the aerosols, with facemasks offering no protection against this fine particulate pollution. Capturing these microorganisms reduces the risk of cross-infection – for the patient, the dentist and the team.

Dental Surgeries use chemical disinfectants to decontaminate hands, surfaces and instruments. While eliminating viruses, germs and fungal spores, disinfectants often contain toxic agents such as aldehydes (formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde) or phenol. Continuous low-level exposure to aldehydes can have negative health effects, such as breathing difficulties, memory impairment, eye and skin irritation and irregular heartbeat. Toxic compounds such as isopropanol, ethanol and n-propanol can also cause irritation of the respiratory tract and the mucous membranes.

Mercury Vapours

Recent research studies have found that both dentists and their staff have a higher than average level of mercury in their body. Mercury is used in the amalgam for routine dental fillings. Mercury transforms from a solid to a gas at room temperature. The gas (which is the most easily absorbed type of mercury) can be inhaled when amalgam is placed in the mouth or removed. Mercury is highly toxic and humans should not be exposed to it.

With this news and patients becoming more health conscious, requests for amalgam removals by dental amalgamator are rising steadily. It is therefore now more important than ever, for dentists to protect themselves and their team from this harmful substance.

Dental Air Conditioning

It is now commonplace for dentists to have air-conditioning systems installed. These installation systems are, however, often a source of contamination themselves, either because they are equipped with less then adequate filtration or because they are drawing in polluted air from outside without filtering it sufficiently. Indoor air contamination can be many times greater than external conditions, and dental air cleaning is required.

Prompted by an ever growing number of dentist offices as customers, Commercial Air Filtration specifies the IQAir Dental Series which has been developed to provide a flexible, cost effective, silent and low maintenance air cleaning solution for dental practices.

How to Choose the Best Dental X-ray Machine

Dental X-rays are one of the most important part of your regular dental treatment. Your dentist uses the specialized imaging technology to look for hidden tooth decay – also called cavities – and can show dental issues such as abscessed teeth, dental tumors, and cysts. The purpose of these machines is to see things that are not visible by visual examination of the mouth alone. Dentists can use the images produced to see the teeth as well as the bones and soft tissues around them. Finding cavities, examining teeth roots, viewing tooth development, and checking the underlying bone health are all functions performed by various dental x ray machines.

When contemplating the change to digital dental in your practice, the choices can be confusing for the dentist. Dental radiography has evolved from film and chemical developers into a highly technical process that involves various types of digital x-ray machines, as well as powerful dental software programs to assist the dentist with image acquisition and diagnostic analysis of the acquired images. When making the decision to purchase x-ray equipment, the doctor needs to research the available options thoroughly, in order to make an informed choice for the “right” machine for his or her practice.

The first question that a doctor should ask themselves is, “What is the main type of treatment that I provide my patients?” If you are a general practitioner, a standard 2D panorex will provide all of the imaging requirements needed for such treatments as caries detection, diagnosis of TMJ issues, OPG images, and images of the patients entire detention in a single x-ray. Many of the newer 2D panoramic units also offer extraoral bitewing imaging capability, which allows the dentist to obtain a bitewing image without putting a sensor or periapical film inside of the patient’s mouth.

The orthodontist requires a way to obtain the size and form of craniofacial structures in the patient. For this reason, a cephalometric extension on the imaging x-ray device is necessary to acquire images that evaluate the five components of the face, the cranium and cranial base, the skeletal maxillae, the skeletal mandible, and maxillary dentition. The cephalometric attachment offers images such as frontal AP and lateral cephs.

If the practice is concentrated in endodontic and implant treatment, then a CBCT machine is the most practical method of providing the doctor with diagnostic tools such as mandibular canal location, surgical guides, and pre-surgical treatment planning with the assistance of powerful 3D dental software applications. The patient is benefited by the reduced radiation exposure provided by these machines.

The Development of Root Canal Treatment

Root canal treatment by root canal treatment equipment is the process of going inside the pulp space and removing the infected, dead tissue. The procedure involves removing the damaged area of the tooth (the pulp), cleaning and disinfecting it and then filling and sealing it. The common causes affecting the pulp are a cracked tooth, a deep cavity, repeated dental treatment to the tooth or trauma.  The space is then disinfected and sealed with special materials.

Generally speaking, whatever the cause of root canal or pulpal disease, root canal or endodontic treatment will be necessary to save the tooth. All dentists receive training in endodontic treatment and can perform root canal procedures, but often a general dentist will refer individuals who need endodontic treatment to an endodontist, a root canal specialist.

Endodontists are dentists who have completed an additional two or more years of advanced residency training in the diagnosis and management of diseases and disorders of the dental pulp tester, and in the diagnosis of dental pain; their focus is therefore on saving teeth. In order to make a proper assessment and accurate diagnosis of which tooth is affected and exactly what is causing the pain, a thorough history and examination is necessary, together with a radiographic picture (x-ray) of the tooth or area.

Your dentist or endodontist will check your medical history and current medications to ensure your health and treatment safety. If you are very nervous, an oral sedative or anti-anxiety medication may be helpful — discuss the options with your dentist or endodontist ahead of time.

Preliminary treatment to remove the decay and the source of infection of the pulp is necessary, along with a determination of whether the lost tooth structure can be restored. If a fracture of the tooth has reached the pulp, or infection is associated with gum disease, it could be more difficult, if not impossible, to save the tooth.

Nowadays, root canal treatments are performed with advanced techniques and materials, making them far more comfortable and faster. After root canal treatment is complete, your restorative dentist will usually place a crown on your tooth to safeguard against fracture.

 

Some Information about Dental Amalgam Separator

Dental offices that place or remove amalgam fillings are required to install and properly maintain an amalgam separator. Depending on the brand, a separator can be purchased from virtually any supply vendor or purchased directly from the manufacturer. Whatever separator is purchased; it is important that the system is promptly installed in order to comply with the new regulations. Proper documentation management is an integral part of this program to ensure that a certificate of recycling is kept on file, and a replacement canister is purchased once the marked fill line is reached or 12 months from the date of installation, whichever occurs first.

The regulations do not specify a minimum amount of time needed before replacing a used filter/canister, but the regulations do state and mandate that the manufacturer guidelines for replacement be followed. Since each amalgam separator is required to conduct testing for the ISO certification based on a 12-month replacement maximum, most amalgam separators are required to be replaced every 12 months or once the canister is full. This not only ensures that the separator is functioning as certified, but also to prevent the separator from moving into bypass mode, which would allow the wastewater to flow unrestricted or filtered directly into the separator. The EPA recommends that an amalgam separator should be monitored monthly to ensure the canister is replaced per the manufacturer’s instructions for use, and that a backup canister is kept on site to ensure proper replacement is conducted at the appropriate time.

Most separators are compatible with both large- and small- capacity dental offices and can be used with dry vacuum or wet vacuum systems. That being said, it is best to check with the manufacturer or distributor to make sure the right amalgam separator system is purchased.

The amalgam separator is installed before the main vacuum line intersects with the plumbing in other parts of the building, and separates solids before reaching the wastewater. The typical plumbing configuration in a dental office involves a chairside trap for each chair and a central vacuum pump with a vacuum pump filter. Chairside traps and vacuum pump filters remove approximately 78% of dental amalgamator particles from the waste stream. These chairside traps cannot be cleaned or washed; they must be recycled to ensure that amalgam particles are properly managed.

Most separator designs rely on the force of the dental facility’s vacuum to draw wastewater into the separator. These separators are estimated to reduce the discharge of metals to POTWs by at least 8.8 tons per year, about half of which is comprised of mercury.

Most amalgam separators use sedimentation processes to filter solids. The high specific gravity of amalgam allows effective separation of amalgam from suspension in wastewater. The weight of amalgam is 2x – 3x that of most sediments found in dental wastewater, which allows the particles to separate and settle at the bottom of the canister.