The Development of Root Canal Treatment

Root canal treatment by root canal treatment equipment is the process of going inside the pulp space and removing the infected, dead tissue. The procedure involves removing the damaged area of the tooth (the pulp), cleaning and disinfecting it and then filling and sealing it. The common causes affecting the pulp are a cracked tooth, a deep cavity, repeated dental treatment to the tooth or trauma.  The space is then disinfected and sealed with special materials.

Generally speaking, whatever the cause of root canal or pulpal disease, root canal or endodontic treatment will be necessary to save the tooth. All dentists receive training in endodontic treatment and can perform root canal procedures, but often a general dentist will refer individuals who need endodontic treatment to an endodontist, a root canal specialist.

Endodontists are dentists who have completed an additional two or more years of advanced residency training in the diagnosis and management of diseases and disorders of the dental pulp tester, and in the diagnosis of dental pain; their focus is therefore on saving teeth. In order to make a proper assessment and accurate diagnosis of which tooth is affected and exactly what is causing the pain, a thorough history and examination is necessary, together with a radiographic picture (x-ray) of the tooth or area.

Your dentist or endodontist will check your medical history and current medications to ensure your health and treatment safety. If you are very nervous, an oral sedative or anti-anxiety medication may be helpful — discuss the options with your dentist or endodontist ahead of time.

Preliminary treatment to remove the decay and the source of infection of the pulp is necessary, along with a determination of whether the lost tooth structure can be restored. If a fracture of the tooth has reached the pulp, or infection is associated with gum disease, it could be more difficult, if not impossible, to save the tooth.

Nowadays, root canal treatments are performed with advanced techniques and materials, making them far more comfortable and faster. After root canal treatment is complete, your restorative dentist will usually place a crown on your tooth to safeguard against fracture.


What’s the Basis for Successful Endodontic Treatment

Root canal shaping is one of the most important steps in canal treatment. It is essential to determine the efficacy of all subsequent procedures, including chemical disinfection and root canal obturation are the basis for successful endodontic endo motor treatment, aiming to debride the root canal, to remove contaminated dentin, and to create an ideal canal shape for three-dimensional filling .

The main objective of a clinician is to mechanically and chemically cleanse the root canal system thoroughly, making it free of microorganisms and their substrates.

The root with a graceful tapering canal and a single apical foramen has long been established as an exception rather than the rule. Bifurcating canals, multiple foramina, fins, deltas, loops, cul-de-sacs, intercanal links, C-shaped canals, and accessory canals have most commonly been faced by the investigators in most teeth .

The instrumentation of the apical matrix to a large size leads to more anatomical irregularities and increases irrigant exchange in the apical third. Apical enlargement during canal cleaning and shaping procedures increases the likelihood of achieving maximum elimination of bacteria from root canal system , though a major part of the canal remains uncleaned even after thorough cleaning and shaping .

Until recently, most investigations have involved counting the number of canals and foramina and categorizing how the canals join or split. Majority of studies have tried to evaluate the shape of the canal systems( root canal treatment equipment ) and its clinical implications than to evaluate the actual preoperative size of the canal .

However, it is recommended not to widen the root canal to a larger extent to avoid unnecessary weakening of the root and increased risk of fracture. Regarding modern concepts, the final canal allows adequate irrigation and close adaptation of the filling material during obturation . Working width (WW) is relatively new concept, which involves perceiving a root canal in both perpendicular (working length) and horizontal (WW) dimensions. Thus, endodontic ―working width‖ has always remained unforgotten dimension during root canal procedure without solid scientific evidence; however, it is still not clear ―how large is enough.

What’s the Diagnosis of Endodontics Depends On

November 4, 2016 (Newswire) –Diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical outcome assessment in endodontics depend to a large extent on radiographic examinations. Conventional periapical radiographs, either captured on conventional x-ray film( dental x ray machine portable ) or digital are used for the management of endodontic problems provide limited information because of the combination of their two dimensional nature, geometric distortion, anatomical noise, and temporal perspective.

Useful information such as the presence, location and extent of periradicular lesions, the anatomy of root-canals( root canal treatment equipment ) and the proximity of adjacent anatomical structures provided by periapical radiographs are exposed during endodontic treatment procedures . Inspite of widespread use periapical images, either captured on x-ray film or digital sensors, provide limited information .

The most important limitation of periapical radiographs is that they do not always accurately reflect the anatomy being assessed because of the complexity of the maxillofacial skeleton . In endodontic practice, radiographs are recorded using the paralleling technique / long-cone or right-angle technique, instead of the bisecting angle technique, as it produces more geometrically accurate images.

For accurate reproduction of anatomy in the paralleling technique, the radiographic film or RVG sensor should be placed parallel to the long axis of the tooth, and the x-ray beam should be directed perpendicular both to the image receptor and the tooth being assessed. The lack of long-axis orientation results in geometric distortion of the radiographic image.

Another important principle in endodontic radiology is to display the structures of diagnostic interest onto a background as homogeneous as possible . However, the anatomical structures surrounding the tooth may superimpose and cause difficulty in interpreting periapical radiographs.Various studies have demonstrated the difficulty of radiographically visualizing the periapical lesions confined to the cancellous bone, as the denser overlying cortical plate masks the area of interest.

Anatomical noise also accounts for some underestimation of the size of periapical lesion on radiographic images .Anatomical noise is dependent on several factors such as non-optimal irradiation geometry, overlying anatomy,the thickness of the cancellous bone and cortical plate, and the relationship of the root apices to the cortical plate.

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